Autism perspectives

Below are questions I hosts asked two autistic women both involved in autism advocacy about what life is like for autistic people and what changes they want to see within society, what we can see that just two peoples experiences are very different and orders of magnitude different. From this i hope to allow people to appreciate the uniqueness of everyones experiences and think about their own strength . From the experiences discussed here we also learn that there needs to be better intervention at an early age for autistic people and better understanding on female autism

The first woman I interviewed is Kathleen McDermott who is a social media influencer and youtuber doing vlogs about her experiences and general life

When did you find out you had autism and how did you find out? found out I had autism when I was 11 or 12 years old at school.

How did you first respond and feel when you found out you were autistic and how did your family respond?

My family were surprised when they found out that I was autistic as my brother was diagnosed first then, they tested me and turned out I had the exactly the same. I didn’t understand what it was that I had when I was in school but growing up through college and university I understood it more.

What has been the best parts about it and what are the challenges you face?


The best part I love about autism is having my memory. I can remember and absorb so much information, it’s like a special gift that I have. There has been a lot of challenges such as: being in a new environment, learning new skills, having things done in a certain way, don’t like people touching my body or my food. Get really sensitive so I had to learn how to adapt that. So many things that I could mention about that.

Could you describe some of the typical behaviours of someone with autism?

I know you are involved in some autism communities and try to offer help, what has aspired you to do that?

If someone says something nasty to an autistic person they can start to cry but the other person wouldn’t realise why they had upset them or how to control them.

How would you want ‘neurotypical’ people to treat you?

What changes do you wish to see in society that could allow for autistic people to live more fulfilling lives in their communities?

Meg Twibhill interview

This is another female youtuber focusing on information about eye strength and how to navigate eye diffuclties and once again doing vlogs and also advice videos

Here are the questions: 

When did you find out you had autism and how did you find out?

​I’ve thought I had autism since I was fourteen/fifteen because I had a lot of the symptoms of autism & I’ve always struggled to fit in, but I was formally diagnosed at 23

How did you first respond and feel when you found out you were autistic? How did your family respond? 

​When I was formally diagnosed, it was somewhat of a relief to know there was a diagnostic reason behind my actions, reactions, and interactions. It also made me feel like a bit of an outcast, more so than usual, because of the stigma attached to autism, particularly in the older generation. 

​My mum wasn’t the most or least supportive. I didn’t tell her I was being assessed for autism, but she understands that it’s a reason for my anxiety & depression. She hasn’t treated me any differently than before, but I don’t think she’s told anyone else in our family. 

What has been the best parts about it, and what are the challenges you face? 

The best part is knowing the reason for my behaviours and dislikes. Honestly, I find it sucks because we’re in such a social world and I’m not entirely sure how to interact with it all. 

​The challenging part for me is that I’m afraid to start conversations or try and become friends with people as I have the mentality that I am annoying, and no one would want to be friends with me. I’m aware this isn’t completely true, but past experiences don’t help avoid it.

Could you describe some of the typical behaviours of someone with autism?

​A lack of eye contact, not wanting to be touched, obsessive hobbies, some level of OCD, neurological deficit, very set in their ways, socially withdrawn. 

I know you are involved in some autism communities and try to offer help, what has aspired you to do that?

​Not everyone with autism is typical, especially with how autism is still portrayed in the media. We can be borderline normal too. 

How would you want ‘neurotypical’ people to treat you? 

​They don’t know I’ve got autism. They just think I’m shy/socially anxious/socially withdrawn due to previous personal experiences. They largely just think I’m shy, or very opinionated/argumentative when I get going. 

What changes do you wish to see in society that could allow for autistic people to live more fulfilling lives in their communities?

​Education that not everyone with autism is a freak/useless/stupid/incapable. We’re not. We can be fully functional and slip through the nets and not diagnosed until adulthood. It’s like dyslexics were once thought to just be thick, or those with mental health conditions being considered crazy. We just need a little more help than normal people a lot of the time. 

from the two interviews it is clear with one thing that peoples diagnosis ages are varied, and we need to do a better job , at having early intervention programs ,

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